Staying safe in your AHI furnished apartment during severe weather is important!

AHI has apartments at communities all across the United States. We are always keeping an eye on major weather events that may effect our guests.

Be weather aware and be prepared. Pay attention to local weather reports in your area.

There are many different alerts that the National Weather Service has implemented over the years. To make sure you know what each means, we’ve compiled a list of the most common. You can find the entire list of warnings, watches and advisories here.

Hurricane Watch

A Hurricane Watch is issued when a tropical cyclone containing winds of 64 kt (74 mph) or higher poses a possible threat, generally within 48 hours. These winds may be accompanied by storm surge, coastal flooding, and/or river flooding.

The watch does not mean that hurricane conditions will occur. It only means that these conditions are possible.

Hurricane Warning

A Hurricane Warning is issued when sustained winds of 64 kt (74 mph) or higher associated with a tropical cyclone are expected in 36 hours or less. These winds may be accompanied by storm surge, coastal flooding, and/or river flooding. A hurricane warning can remain in effect when dangerously high water or a combination of dangerously high water and exceptionally high waves continue, even though winds may be less than hurricane force.

Wind Advisory

A Wind Advisory is issued when the following conditions are expected:

Severe Thunderstorm Watch

A Severe Thunderstorm Watch is issued when severe thunderstorms are possible in and near the watch area. It does not mean that they will occur. It only means they are possible.

Severe thunderstorms are defined as follows:

Severe Thunderstorm Warning

A Severe Thunderstorm Warning is issued when severe thunderstorms are occurring or imminent in the warning area.

Severe thunderstorms are defined as follows: Winds of 58 mph or higher

Tornado Watch

A Tornado Watch is issued when severe thunderstorms and tornadoes are possible in and near the watch area. It does not mean that they will occur. It only means they are possible.

Tornado Warning

A Tornado Warning is issued when a tornado is imminent. When a tornado warning is issued, seek safe shelter immediately.

Tropical Storm Watch

A Tropical Storm Watch is issued when a tropical cyclone containing winds of 34 to 63 kt (39 to 73 mph) or higher poses a possible threat, generally within 48 hours. These winds may be accompanied by storm surge, coastal flooding, and/or river flooding.

The watch does not mean that tropical storm conditions will occur. It only means that these conditions are possible.

Tropical Storm Warning

A Tropical Storm Warning is issued when sustained winds of 34 to 63 kt (39 to 73 mph) or higher associated with a tropical cyclone are expected in 36 hours or less. These winds may be accompanied by storm surge, coastal flooding, and/or river flooding.

Flash Flood Watch

A Flash Flood Watch is issued when conditions are favorable for flash flooding. It does not mean that flash flooding will occur, but it is possible.

Flash Flood Warning

A Flash Flood Warning is issued when flash flooding is imminent or occurring.

Excessive Heat Warning

An Excessive Heat Warning is issued when the heat index value is expected to reach or exceed 110 degrees (east of the Blue Ridge) or 105 degrees (west of the Blue Ridge) within the next 12 to 24 hours. An Excessive Heat Warning may be issued for lower criteria if it is early in the season or during a multi-day heat wave.

Heat Advisory

A Heat Advisory is issued when the heat index value is expected to reach 105 to 109 degrees (east of the Blue Ridge) or 100 to 104 degrees (west of the Blue Ridge) within the next 12 to 24 hours. A Heat Advisory may be issued for lower criteria if it is early in the season or during a multi-day heat wave.

Fire Weather Watch

A Fire Weather Watch is issued to alert fire officials and firefighters of potentially dangerous fire weather conditions within the next 24 to 36 hours. 

FEMA offers some tips specifically for apartment residents living in Hurricane prone areas.

Bring inside any outdoor furniture, planters, decor and other items from patios, balconies or breezeways.

Store your 10 days’ worth of supplies
Storage space in apartments is often limited so storing your supplies may be challenging. If your kitchen is small, find space in a closet, under the bed or even behind the couch. Fill bathtubs and the washer with water that can be used to flush toilets and for sanitation needs.

Steer clear of windows
Don’t stand near windows during a storm, and keep your curtains drawn. The National Hurricane Center advises against using tape since it can cause a false sense of security and also lead to larger, more dangerous shards of glass blowing through your apartment.

Check your insurance coverage
Confirm what is covered. Contact your agent to insure your personal property and to buy flood insurance, if it is not included.

Get to Know Your Neighbors

It’s important to know who may need or can lend a helping hand in an emergency. Residents will likely gather in communal areas, and working together helps everyone get through the emergency.

Park your vehicle in a safe area

Assess your assigned parking spot and, if necessary, take your car to another location away from possible flooding and falling debris.